Harsh, I know.  But it’s probably true.  Even advisors who tell me how good their website is, fail to understand the reason for even having one.  So let’s get that out first.

Your website’s purpose is NOT about:

  1. Being pretty. Pretty is useless if it doesn’t tell you who visited.
  2. Building your brand: You don’t have enough money to truly build your brand.  Leave that to Edward Jones & UBS.  You have far more weapons than they do.
  3. Getting views: Who cares who visits if you don’t know who they are?  Chances are half of your Google Analytic hits are from overseas hackers.  Two thousand views a month is meaningless if you have to wait for them to call you.
  4. That’s right.  It’s not about you.  It’s about them.

Some people take major offense at someone insulting their website.  It’s like one of their children.  So if you’re ticked off, get over it.

Here’s what a website should have:

A compelling offer that makes taking the next step toward working with you a no-brainer.  Advisors with whom I work usually offer a package of materials directed at solving a serious problem in the prospect’s life.

A headline highlighting one major problem or goal that will draw readers into the rest of your home page.  Contrast headlines from the National Enquirer to the failing New York Times.  Which one draws your attention. pain points to help readers identify whether they’re in the right place, plus help them see how much they need your help. People do not make major decisions without an emotional reason for doing so.

Two to three pain points to help readers identify whether they’re in the right place, plus help them see how much they need your help. People do not make major decisions without an emotional reason for doing so.

Three to four possibility statements to get readers excited about what you have to offer. Here’s where you can stand apart from the “Big Box Store Advisors.”  They’re required to use boring terms and staid imagery.  You aren’t.

A clear and concise call to action telling readers exactly how to get started solving their challenges or reaching their goals. In other words, in order to take advantage of item #1, you must be willing to provide your name, mailing address, and email address.  The mailing address is essential.   Without it, all you’ll get is the Gmail account they use whenever they buy something online.  It’s full of junk.  We all have one.

All of this should appear on the top of your screen.

No one cares where you went to school, or that you have six kids, or your grandfather knew Admiral Perry.  Save it for the “About” page.

Overall, your website’s design should be simple and dynamic.  That means you change its appearance about every 12 months, but the overall strategy stays the same.  Make different offers, try different headlines and pain points.

Lastly, spend some money promoting your website.

For more information on this strategy, give me a call.  I’m happy to share:  513-563-7526.